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OPINION: Pattern of deception

by BRENT REGAN/Common Sense
| September 22, 2023 1:00 AM

A large portion of what we call “intelligence” is pattern recognition. Patterns of sounds are recognized as words or music. Patterns of symbols are written language. Patterns of features are faces. Captcha asks you to recognize items that fit a pattern to prove you are human. Intelligence tests rely heavily on pattern recognition by asking you to find the next number or symbol of a set or to determine which word does not fit with others.

Sometimes hidden patterns elude us. We can’t see them until we are directed where to look. However, once you see the pattern it becomes impossible to un-see. Let’s do a test and find out if you are smart enough to see the pattern.

Randy Weaver lived with his family on a remote mountain top in North Idaho. Weaver was known to the local FBI, who classified him as a “white supremacist.” He had a deep distrust of the US government and moved to a remote location to be left alone. In October 1989 an ATF informant purchased two shotguns from Weaver whose barrels were 1/8 inch shorter than the legal limit. This began a cascade of events that ended on Aug. 23, 1992, with the deaths of three people and a dog.

The lead FBI agent was Wayne Manis and the above facts were taken from his autobiography “The Street Agent- After taking on the mob, the Klan and the Aryan Nations, he walks softly and carries a .357 Magnum — The true story” chapter 16 The Killings at Ruby Ridge. Agent Manis retired from the FBI and now lives in Coeur d’Alene. Ruby Ridge was the last chapter in his book.

During a press conference in August of 2017 concerning the riot in Charlottesville, President Trump said “you had some very bad people in that group. But you also had people that were very fine people on both sides.” “I’m not talking about the neo-Nazis and the white nationalists, because they should be condemned totally — but you had many people in that group other than neo-Nazis and white nationalists, okay?”

The main stream media accused Trump of being a white supremacist by publishing only the first part of the quote and a clipped video as proof. The “Fine People Hoax” spread like wildfire despite Trump’s prior and subsequent condemnation of white supremacists, neo Nazis and other hate groups. Eventually many in the media admitted that the Fine People Hoax was indeed a hoax but many on the left cling to it to this day.

Joe Biden still repeats it and claims the Fine People comments were the reason he ran for president. If true then arguably the Fine People Hoax accusation of white supremacy was responsible for Biden winning the presidency and the subsequent deaths of 13 solders in Afghanistan and tens of thousands of deaths in Ukraine, both likely avoided under a Trump administration.

In the run-up to the November 2020 North Idaho College Board of Trustee election, the progressive supporters of the progressive candidates accused their conservative opponents of white nationalism and white supremacy, as well as a threat that if conservatives Greg McKenzie and Michael Barnes were elected the accreditation of NIC would be put at risk.

How would these progressive agents “know” that accreditation would be at risk? Accreditation issues normally concern academic or financial matters, neither of which the board of trustees has direct influence. Obviously the loss of accreditation threat was not made as a prediction, it was announcing a plan.

For years NIC leadership had been pushing a progressive social justice agenda, at taxpayer expense, which was not consistent with community values. Enrollment was declining despite population growth. Forced mask mandates, a resolution in support of BLM, on campus drag shows, and others, had the community upset and ready for change. When McKenzie and Barnes were elected in a landslide, the progressives' plan to nullify the election results and seize back control was put in place.

One of the remaining progressives on the board of trustees, Christie Wood also serves on the board of the Kootenai County Task Forces on Human Relations and it was that organization that filed the accreditation complaint against NIC. Let that sink in.

The complaint had little merit on its own so board of trustees' dysfunction needed to be induced. For this a progressive activist and co-belligerent, SaveNIC and North Idaho Republican (RINO) founder Christa Hazel led an effort to remove Trustee Barnes by false accusation and threats of litigation. Barnes did resign leaving the board of trustees deadlocked. Documents show that Wood and former Sen. John Goedde conspired to take control of the board of trustees by having the remaining progressives resign leaving less than a quorum and allowing the State Board of Education to appoint three trustees thus defeating the will of the people. Six months later during the next election the people chose to put conservatives back in the majority.

Biden supporter and Never-Trumper Christa Hazel and her gang at “SaveNIC” dedicated themselves to be as disruptive as possible at the board of trustee meetings in an effort to cause the very “board dysfunction” they needed to lose accreditation. Shouting, harassing, swearing and even pulling a fire alarm became the norm. Not once did any member of “SaveNIC” ask the board of trustees what they could do to help the board save accreditation. Not once.

The “SaveNIC” propaganda engine is still running at full throttle without remorse even after it inspired an NIC employee to physically attack conservative board of trustees member Todd Banducci while he was in his office at work.

No doubt you now see the pattern of how a false accusation of being a “racist” can compound until it eventually ends badly. But did you see the second pattern?

Progressive activist Christa Hazel is a member or founder of SaveNIC, North Idaho “Republicans,” and Women for Biden, and she promoted the Fine People Hoax. She boasts about being in the center of controversy. As NIC student body president she led the fight to discriminate against the Gay Pride Alliance on campus. Her maiden name back then was Christa Manis, the proud daughter of the FBI agent in charge of Ruby Ridge.

Now you’re smart enough to see the pattern because for you,

It’s just common sense.

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Brent Regan is chairman of the Kootenai County Republican Central Committee.