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Coeur d’Alene seeking students to represent on committees

by CRAIG NORTHRUP
Staff Writer | August 13, 2020 1:00 AM

Coeur d’Alene is on the hunt for the next generation of political leaders, as the city is calling for student representatives to serve on the various committees and commissions within its jurisdiction.

“My son was actually a representative for Parks and Recreation,” Councilwoman Amy Evans said, “and I’ve seen the difference it can make. I think it’s a great opportunity for a student to learn city operations, to develop their leadership skills, and it’s a great opportunity to have a voice in the community.”

High school students between the ages of 14 and 18 can apply. If appointed, the student will serve a few hours once a month to hear and debate the matters that come before each committee. Those committees might include the Parking Commission, the CDATV Committee, the Parks and Recreation Commission, the Library Board, the Arts Commission, the Childcare Commission, the Urban Forestry Committee and the Pedestrian/Bike Committee, among others.

Evans said the experience can help students cultivate valuable skills they will need later in life.

“It teaches the power of being an intentional listener,” she said. “It teaches the value of having confidence in sharing their opinions and thoughts. It teaches them how to work collaboratively with other groups and people, and it teaches them visionary and planning skills.”

Mayor Steve Widmyer agreed, adding that the lesson is not only the student’s to learn.

“A student representative brings a different perspective on how to look at a different situation,” Widmyer said. “It allows us to be able to listen to how the younger generation views issues. It’s important to listen to all points of view, including those from our students.”

Students interested in serving are encouraged to visit the city’s website — www.cdaid.org — and look over the various committees and commissions. Those who wish to apply should email amyf@cdaid.org before the Sept. 30 deadline.

“Having a student on a city commission allows that student to learn about how someone can give back to the community,” Widmyer urged, “to make our city a better place. These opportunities open the door to a lifetime of community service.”

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Widmyer