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How to prevent sacral sitting in your mobility device

by A.T.P. & Michael Derosie-Drye
| December 15, 2010 8:00 PM

There are several studies that prove sacral sitting or sitting in a sacral position, can cause decrease in daily functions such as grooming, cooking, and reaching vital objects; it can also lead to decreased overall productivity, and lead to debilitating or even deadly secondary complications.

Even though we know what the outcomes are of a poor seated position, why does this still occur at such high frequency? What can we do about this problem?

First and foremost is a proper seating evaluation done with a team of professionals consisting of your physician, a trained physical or occupational therapist, and an assistive technology professional (A.T.P.) from the supplier. By working with trained professionals, you know you are receiving the most suitable equipment available.

Pelvic position is the most important key to prevent sacral sitting. Your clinicians should determine any postural limitations and/or deformities. Next, choose the most appropriate cushion available. And finally, determine the appropriate leg and foot position. Two common mistakes leading to sacral sitting are seat depth that is too long and incorrect seat to floor height.

Once we have a stable pelvis, we can focus on upper extremity position. Determining your limitations, and needs will lead to what back rest is chosen. When the correct seating products have been chosen, your hips should be all the way back into the chair against the back rest, and one to two inches from the end of your cushion to the back of your knee.

To find out more about how to prevent sacral sitting or are interested in finding out how you may qualify for mobility assistance, please feel free to contact American Seating & Mobility at (877) 339-1234.

By MICHAEL DEROSIE-DRYE, A.T.P.

There are several studies that prove sacral sitting or sitting in a sacral position, can cause decrease in daily functions such as grooming, cooking, and reaching vital objects; it can also lead to decreased overall productivity, and lead to debilitating or even deadly secondary complications.

Even though we know what the outcomes are of a poor seated position, why does this still occur at such high frequency? What can we do about this problem?

First and foremost is a proper seating evaluation done with a team of professionals consisting of your physician, a trained physical or occupational therapist, and an assistive technology professional (A.T.P.) from the supplier. By working with trained professionals, you know you are receiving the most suitable equipment available.

Pelvic position is the most important key to prevent sacral sitting. Your clinicians should determine any postural limitations and/or deformities. Next, choose the most appropriate cushion available. And finally, determine the appropriate leg and foot position. Two common mistakes leading to sacral sitting are seat depth that is too long and incorrect seat to floor height.

Once we have a stable pelvis, we can focus on upper extremity position. Determining your limitations, and needs will lead to what back rest is chosen. When the correct seating products have been chosen, your hips should be all the way back into the chair against the back rest, and one to two inches from the end of your cushion to the back of your knee.

To find out more about how to prevent sacral sitting or are interested in finding out how you may qualify for mobility assistance, please feel free to contact American Seating & Mobility at (877) 339-1234.

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