ADVERTISING: Advertorial — JONATHON M. SASSER: Poor memory

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One of the most concerning public health challenges we face today is that of cognitive decline. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, deaths from Alzheimer’s have increased 145% since the year 2000, 1 in 3 seniors dies with Alzheimer’s or another disease, and it is estimated to have cost the nation $290 billion in 2019. Think about that for just a moment — 1 in 3 is a staggering number. What’s more concerning is that despite the 82% of seniors who consider it important to get cognitive checks, only 16% actually get regular cognitive assessments, thus depriving them of the chance to get ahead of the disease process. An ever increasing body of research is indicating the criticality of staying ahead of the disease process.

One such study regarding the dangers of soybean oil, the most prevalent oil in the American diet, emphasizes the hazards of long-term consumption. This particular study conducted at UC Riverside not only saw strong connections between soybean oil, obesity and diabetes, but also neurological conditions like autism, Alzheimer’s disease, anxiety and depression. You may be thinking “I don’t use soybean oil.” But I can almost guarantee that you consume a lot more than you think. Soybean oil is one of the many low quality “filler” ingredients used in packaged foods because of the low cost. Low quality fats are of particular concern because of the way these “damaged” fats interfere with many of our metabolic processes, hormone pathways and even just basic cellular function. More than ever, it is critical to read the packaging on your foods, or better yet, opt for foods with no packaging whenever possible.

Once we’ve looked into the underlying causes of a condition and established a treatment plan, our focus shifts towards educating patients on the many facets of daily life that factor into their overall picture of health. We are constantly flooded with a barrage of health trends and health foods that are simply not healthy, or perhaps are healthy only in certain contexts. I am here to help you sort through those countless trends to make decisions that will truly work for you. For example, there are many brain training games that claim to boost cognitive performance, but in reality, simple social dialogue has shown far more promise in keeping all those crucial neural networks in the brain strong. Another important recommendation for staying sharp is physical activity, but there are certain types of physical activity that send the activity of several protective, longevity related mechanisms through the roof compared to simple lower-intensity cardio.

If you or anyone you know are interested in discovering more about the many nuances to optimizing brain health, join us in our upcoming class, Brain Fog, Poor Memory and Lack of Concentration, 7 p.m. Feb. 12 at Vital Health in Coeur d’Alene. Fee: $10. RSVP: 208-765-1994. Hint: This is an issue that is so much more important than just you feeling good; think about all of the memories and great experiences we all stand to gain with kids, grandkids, other family and friends by staying on top of cognitive health.

• • •

Jonathan M. Sasser holds a Master of Science degree in Oriental Medicine, is a Licensed Acupuncturist and is board certified in Oriental Medicine by the NCCAOM. He has more than 3,000 hours of training in acupuncture, classical Oriental Medicine, herbal medicine and nutrition.

Additionally, Jon also holds a bachelor’s degree in sports medicine. Jon is a “Health Detective.” He looks beyond your symptom picture and investigates WHY you are experiencing your symptoms in the first place. Jonathan is currently accepting new patients and offers natural health care services and whole food nutritional supplements at Vital Health in Coeur d’Alene.

Visit our website at www.vitalhealthcda.com to learn more about Jonathan, view a list of upcoming health classes and read other informative articles. Jonathan can be reached at 208-765-1994 and would be happy to answer any questions regarding this topic.

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