ADVERTISING: Advertorial — HOLLY CARLING: Foggy days: Reasons for brain fog

Print Article

Many people complain of “brain fog.” Some define it as an inability to concentrate or easily getting distracted, while others say they go about feeling like their head is stuffed with cotton and they feel sleepy. To eliminate it, many resort to coffee to try to focus or on sweets to stay awake. Both just make the problem worse.

As always, looking for the underlying culprit goes far in remedying it. Since there are many causes for brain fog, we need to do some investigative work. Blood work is rarely helpful in identifying a cause for two reasons. First, brain fog isn’t considered a medical condition, therefore, there is no medical protocol for discovering a cause, much less a treatment for it. Secondly, blood work mostly identifies diseases and unless the disease is drastic enough that follow-up testing reveals an underlying pathology, the protocol will be based on a disease model at that point, not a health model. So, where do we start?

I prefer to look at what an individual is doing or not doing first. Diet is first. We need minerals, protein and fat in our diet, in sufficient amounts, to run our varied and complex systems that are responsible for brain and body energy. A diet lacking in nutrient density is bound to have an adverse effect on our brain (and everything else). The more an individual eats processed foods, restaurant foods, fast foods and junk foods, the more likely they will not be feeding the brain and energy systems. Pure and simple.

Some experts in the nutrition field recommend “intermittent fasting” as a way to give the digestive system a break. Helping the digestive system helps to ensure more nutrient absorption and a break for the energy systems. Intermittent fasting varies with the practitioner recommending it, but in a nutshell, breakfast is held off until later in the day, perhaps 11 a.m., lunch follows about two hours later, then an early dinner at about 5 p.m. This means, you are eating all your food — two or three meals per day — within a six-hour period. Before and after that chunk of time is no food, not even a snack. While I am a proponent of that in certain cases, it isn’t a good idea for everyone. Expert help is recommended.

There are some pretty good cleanses (aka detox or detoxification programs) out there, but not all ensure that both Phase I and Phase II detoxification pathways are engaged, and that is vital. If not, your brain fog could get worse during the cleanse. Here again, it is not for everyone and should be expertly guided. Certain health conditions would be contraindicated.

There are many other reasons for brain fog that we have control over and that will be discussed in next week’s article. Learn more by attending our upcoming health class, Brain Fog, Poor Memory & Lack of Concentration, 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 24, at Vital Health in Coeur d’Alene. Fee: $10. RSVP: 208-765-1994 or register here: http://bit.ly/MentalClarityClass

• • •

Holly Carling is a Doctor of Oriental Medicine, Licensed Acupuncturist, Doctor of Naturopathy, Clinical Nutritionist and Master Herbologist with nearly four decades of experience. Carling is a “Health Detective.” She looks beyond your symptom picture and investigates WHY you are experiencing your symptoms in the first place. Carling is currently accepting new patients and offers natural health care services and whole food nutritional supplements in her Coeur d’Alene clinic. Visit Carling’s website at www.vitalhealthcda.com to learn more about Carling, view a list of upcoming health classes and read other informative articles. Carling can be reached at 208-765-1994 and would be happy to answer any questions regarding this topic.

Print Article

Read More Healthy Community

ADVERTISING: Advertorial — HOLLY CARLING: Stress: A weighty matter

April 24, 2019 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press There is a very strong correlation between stress and weight gain. Since we all have stress in our lives, then how can we ever lose weight? Understanding the mechanisms of how stress contributes to w...

Comments

Read More

ADVERTISING: Advertorial — DR. WAYNE M. FICHTER: Mind body connection: Part 2

April 24, 2019 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press Research suggests that our negative thoughts and emotions can make us sick and even affect our lifespans. Aside from having positive and happy thoughts for the rest of their lives, what is a person t...

Comments

Read More

ADVERTISING: Advertorial — GEORGE BALLING: There’s California appellated and then there’s California appellated

April 24, 2019 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press The appellation designation on a wine bottle is every bit as important as the vintage. In order for a wine made in the US to bear the designation of a particular growing region or appellation in gene...

Comments

Read More

ADVERTISING: Advertorial — DR. WENDY CUNNINGHAM: Natural solutions for Raynaud’s

April 17, 2019 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press Raynaud’s syndrome is a condition where small blood vessels narrow (vasospasm) and temporarily restrict blood flow to the extremities. The tissue turns white with lack of blood flow and then blue fro...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(208) 664-8176
215 N. Second St
Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 83814

©2019 The Coeur d'Alene Press Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X
X